Glencoe Massacre 1692 

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Commemorates the infamous massacre of members of the Clan MacDonald by their guests, the first and second companies of the Earl of Argyll's Regiment of Foot in 1692. Often described as perpetrated by the Campbell Clan, only a minority of the regiment bore that name. The massacre was ordered because the chief of the MacDonald clan was said to have been slow to take the oath of allegiance to King William. A consequence of the massacre was to spur recruitment to the Jacobite cause and the subsequent 1745 Rising.

Battle of Killiecrankie 1689

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The first battle of the first Jacobite Rising in 1689, following the accession of William of Orange to the Scottish throne. Viscount Dundee raised a mainly Highland rebel army and clashed with Government forces near the Killiecrankie Pass. The Jacobites won, demonstrating the effectiveness of the Highland charge, but the death of Dundee left the rebellion leaderless. The landscape of the battlefield is well preserved and there is a visitor centre near the spot called the Soldier’s Leap. The victory was an inspiration to the Jacobites and was celebrated in song and verse.

Battlefield of Falkirk Muir 1746

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The penultimate battle of the Second Jacobite Rising and a victory for the rebel forces, following their retreat from England into Scotland. A government force under Henry Hawley set out to relieve Stirling Castle and met Lord George Murray's Jacobite army at Falkirk. The battle was a confused affair and the Jacobites failed to capitalise on their victory. The battlefield, a high moor to the south of Falkirk, is one of the best preserved of its era. A monument stands near the ravine to the north of the site

The Walls of Londonderry 1690

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In 1689 the deposed King James II landed in Ireland with an army of French and Irish Catholics and marched on the Williamite stronghold of Derry. The city, encircled and bombarded, refused to surrender and after 105 days it was relieved by ships of the Royal Navy. The siege is commemorated each August by the Apprentice Boys of Derry. The city’s walls are still intact and original cannon from the time of the siege are displayed on them.

Newtonbutler Battlefield 1689

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The battle was a part of the Williamite War. A Jacobite army under Viscount Mountcashel set out to take Enniskillen, a base from which guerrilla attacks were being mounted by Williamites. Mountcashel started by bombarding Crom Castle some 20 miles south east of Enniskillen. Two days later a Williamite force arrived to confront them and the battle took place a mile south of Newtonbutler. The Jacobites were crushed and suffered heavy casualties

Eilean Donan Castle 1719

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Standing on an islet in Loch Duich, Eilean Donan was founded in the 13th century and became a stronghold of the Clan Mackenzie and Clan Macrae. The Mackenzies' role in the Jacobite Risings, and the presence of Spanish soldiers who had come to support the Old Pretender, led to the Royal Navy bombarding the castle in 1719, partially destroying it. The damage was not repaired until after the First World War when a memorial, flanked by field guns, was created to the men of the Macrae clan who fell in that war.

Siege of Blair Castle, Pitlochry 1745

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The ancient seat of the Dukes and Earls of Atholl, Blair Castle dates in part (Cumming's Tower) from the 13th Century, but mostly from the 17th and 18th centuries. In the Civil Wars it was a Royalist stronghold, then taken by Oliver Cromwell's army in 1650. During the 1745 Jacobite Rising it was besieged, occupied and then abandoned by the Jacobites. In 1844 Queen Victoria granted the then Dukes of Atholl the right to raise a private army, the Atholl Highlanders, still garrisoned in the castle.

Braemar Castle

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Originally built by the Earls of Mar in the late Middle Ages, the present castle dates from the 17th century. The building was torched in 1689 by the 'Black Colonel' John Farquharson, as part of the first Jacobite Rising. In 1715 the Earl of Mar changed sides to support the Jacobites, after which the Crown seized the castle. Following Culloden it served for some years as a garrison for Hanoverian forces. In 1831 the army left and the castle was given to the chiefs of the Clan Farquharson. Today it is the only community operated castle in Scotland

Battlefield of Cromdale 1690

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Last battle on the British mainland of the first Jacobite Rising took place on 30 April - 1 May 1690.  Sir Thomas Livingstone's Government army of dragoons and infantry crushed the Jacobite forces under Major General Thomas Buchan. Cromdale (1690) was the last major battle in Scotland in the 17th century. The Jacobites were unable to mount another rising until 1715. The battlefield lies to the east of Cromdale village on the Haughs of Cromdale. 

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Battle of Solway Moss 1715

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Part of the first Jacobite Rising and the last battle fought on English soil. The Jacobites entered Preston on 9th November, heading south. Faced with government forces south of the River Ribble, they withdrew into the town of Preston where they were besieged. Streets were barricaded and houses were set on fire. Those streets still exist, but there is no monument to the battle which ended with the Jacobites’ surrender on 14th November.

Battle of Preston 1715

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Culloden Battlefield 16 April 1746

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This was the last pitched battle fought on the British mainland, Culloden marked the end of half a century of rebellions aimed at restoring the House of Stuart to the throne. The battle was brief and bloody, and saw the Jacobite army routed by the Hanoverian forces under the Duke of Cumberland. In its aftermath the Government brutally subdued the Highlands and dismantled the clan system. The battlefield is well preserved and attempts have been made to restore it to its original condition. There is a visitor centre with interactive exhibits as well as signage on the battlefield

Fort George, Ardersier 1746

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Fort George was built in the aftermath of Culloden, to pacify the Highlands, This fort is the greatest artillery fortification in Britain. Though open to the public, it remains in use as a garrison and is currently home to the Black Watch, 3rd Battalion, Royal Regiment of Scotland. Never attacked, the fort is ringed by almost a mile of boundary walls. Its collection of arms includes bayoneted muskets, pikes, swords and ammunition pouches. It also contains the Regimental Museum of the Highlanders, with exhibits including uniforms, weapons, medals, World War I memorial plaques, photographs, paintings, memorabilia and regimental regalia. 

Battle of Sheriffmuir 1715

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This key engagement of the 1715 Jacobite Rebellion took place on high ground to the east of Dunblane on 13 November 1715.. The Earl of Mar's Jacobite army outnumbered the government forces, but the outcome was inconclusive. Both sides claimed victory, but it was a strategic win for the Hanoverians as the Jacobite advance was halted and the uprising faltered. Two monuments mark the site, much of which remains open farm and moorland, though parts have been covered by forestry.

Prestonpans Battlefield 1745

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The first battle of the 1745 Jacobite Rising proved a clear victory for the rebel Highlanders under Bonnie Prince Charlie. The defeat of the Government forces gave a great boost to the Jacobites who then marched into England. A cairn memorial marks the site of the battle which was fought on flat open land surrounded by marshes. Today parts of the battlefield have been developed but key features of the landscape, such as the wagonway running through the site, can still be seen.

Sedgmoor Battlefield 1685

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Sedgemoor was the last pitched battle fought on English soil and the last chapter of the Duke of Monmouth’s attempt to seize the crown from James II. Faced with a smaller but more experienced royal army, the rebels made a botched night attack but at daybreak the king’s troops advanced and destroyed the rebel army on 6 July 1685. Monmouth was captured three days later and executed. The marshland of the battlefield has been drained but otherwise little changed. A Pitchfork Rebellion Trail is displayed at Chedzoy church.

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