Blore Heath Battlefield 1459

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After an uneasy period of peace following the First Battle of St Albans in 1455, the Wars of the Roses re-erupted in 1459 with both factions marshalling their supporters. A force marching from Yorkshire to link up with the main Yorkist army at Ludlow was ambushed by a Lancastrian army under Lord Audley, at Blore Heath east of Market Drayton. Audley was killed and the Lancastrians were routed. The battlefield today is enclosed agricultural land with access by public footpath.

Mortimers Cross Battlefield 1459

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A major battle in the Wars of the Roses in which the Yorkist army of Edward, Earl of March, intercepted a Lancastrian army led by Jasper Tudor, Earl of Pembroke, that had marched up from Pembroke. Famous for the occurrence of the parhelion, or sun dog, that appeared to show three suns at sunrise. Edward took this as a good omen and went on to defeat the Lancastrians. The battlefield is believed to lie between Mortimer's Cross and Kingsland, in Herefordshire, where a burial mound and a monument mark the site

Siege of Harlech 1461-68

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Harlech castle is built in a concentric ‘walls within walls’ pattern, and sited on a rock near a cliff edge with only the east side open to attack. In the Wars of the Roses the Lancastrians held out in Harlech for seven years, giving rise to the song Men of Harlech.

Battlefield of Nibley Green 1470

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Though counted as part of the Wars of the Roses, this was really a private feud over the inheritance of Berkeley Castle. In 1470 William, Baron Berkeley issued a challenge to his rival Thomas Talbot, Viscount Lisle to settle the dispute in battle. Berkeley was able to draw on men from the castle garrison and had a numerical advantage. Lisle was killed in the battle and his manor sacked. A supporter of the House of York, Berkeley was made a viscount by Edward IV in 1481. Some of the fallen are buried in Nibley Churchyard. 

Battlefield of Tewksbury 1471

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Climax of the second phase of the Wars of the Roses. A Lancastrian army led by the Duke of Somerset reached Tewkesbury intending to cross the River Severn and join forces with Jasper Tudor in Wales. Instead they turned to fight the pursuing Yorkist army led by Edward IV. The Yorkists prevailed and the Lancastrian heir, Edward Prince of Wales, was killed. Though partly built over, the heart of the battlefield near the Abbey retains the medieval field pattern. There is a battle monument and a visitor trail. A re-enactment of the battle takes place each July.

Alnwick Castle

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The siege of Alnwick (December 1462-6 January 1463) saw the castle captured by the Yorkists, although only after a Lancastrian and Scottish relief army had rescued the garrison. Alnwick changed hands repeatedly between 1461 and 1464.

Hexham Battlefield 1464

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The battle of Hexham resulted in the defeat of the Lancastrians in the North in 1464 in the Wars of the Roses.  The battlefield of Hexham is set in picturesque countryside

Hedgley Moor Battlefield 1464

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1n 1464 a Lancastrian army  ttemtped to ambush a Yorkist party escroting Scoittish emissaries.  They were beated and the famous Percey's leap stone commerates the action on  Hedgely Moor near Mortpeth 

Banburgh Castle

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The castle was once home to the Kings of Northumbria, later an important Border garrison and stronghold against the Scots. During the Wars of the Roses Henry VI was besieged here by Lord Warwick’s forces; it became the first English castle to be destroyed by artillery attack. While most of the present structure dates from Victorian times the castle commands a dramatic aspect overlooking the North Sea shore. 

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Twthill (Tuthill) Battlefield 1461

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A relatively minor skirmish in the Wars of the Roses this battle brought an end to open warfare in Wales and gave Edward IV control of all Wales save Harlech Castle. A Yorkist army under Sir William Herbert met a Lancastrian force led by the Earl of Pembroke outside the walls of Caernarfon. Herbert was victorious and the Lancastrian leaders fled the country.

Battlefield of Edgecote 1469

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The battle of Edgcote was the first major action in the campaigns of 1469-71, the second major period of unrest in the Wars of the Roses. The army of the Earl of Pembroke, was beaten by a rebel force under Robin of Redesdale. Pembroke’s army had been dangerously weakened because, supposedly after an argument the night before, In the following days the king himself was taken prisoner and other of his major supporters captured and executed. With the king under his ‘protection’, Warwick was in effective control of the kingdom.

Bombardment of London 1471

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A Lancastrian Force fleet and their supported in the South East under the Neville Admiral "The Bastard Fauconbourg " laid siege to London.  The Navy mounted guns on the South Bank against the City of London, but were dismounted by the firepower of the Tower.   The Yorkist defenders resisted and fought off their beeiegers, making a sortie resultign battles in Aldgate and Bishopsgate.  This caqn be interp[reted witha bguide. 

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The only registered battlefield in Greater London.  Here is where the Yorkists King Edward IV Edward and his brothers George, and Richard, (The future king Richard III) beat their Uncle Richard Neville Earl of Warwick "the Kingmaker".  It is a great story and makes a good day out. .

Leicester Cathederal

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The putative burial place of Richard III

Towton Battlefield 1461

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The battle of Towton was the largest and important battles of the Wars of the Roses fought  near the village of the same name in Yorkshire. It is claimed to haveb been  "probably the largest and bloodiest battle ever fought on English soil".According to chroniclers, more than 50,000 soldiers from the Houses of York and Lancaster fought for hours amidst a snowstorm on that day, which was Palm Sunday. The engagement brought about a monarchical change in England—Edward IV displaced Henry VI as King of England, driving the head of the Lancastrians and his key supporters out of the country.There interpretation boards and a small interpretation centre.  It is listed by English Heritage as a Registered Battlefield.  

Wakefield Battlefield 1460

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The Battle of Wakefield took place in Sandal Magna near Wakefield, in West Yorkshire in Northern England, on 30 December 1460. It was a major battle of the Wars of the Roses. The opposing forces were an army led by nobles loyal to the captive King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster, his Queen Margaret of Anjou and their seven year-old son Edward, Prince of Wales on one side, and the army of Richard, Duke of York, the rival claimant to the throne, on the other. The Duke of York was killed and his army was destroyed.

Stoke Battlefield  1487

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Stoke field is the decisive battle that quashed the Yorkist rising in favour of Lambert Simnal.  It is less well known than Bosworth but took place only two years later and has many similarities.  There is some information abotu the battle in East Stoke Church, but some research or a guide is needed to interpret the battlefield.  .

Bosworth Battlefield 1485

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The battle of Bosworth, fought on the 22nd August 1485, is one of the best known and was one of the most influential of English battles. It saw perhaps the most dramatic of military reversals in English history. A rebel force defeated a royal army more than twice its size leaving Richard III, the last Plantagenet king, dead on the field and placing Henry VII on the throne as the first of a new, Tudor dynasty.  There is a visitor centre and it is possible visit the rediscovered site witha  guide..

Northampton Battlefield 1460

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The Battle of Northampton was fought on 10 July 1460 near the River Nene, Northamptonshire. The opposing forces were an army led by nobles loyal to the King Henry VI of the House of Lancaster, his Queen Margaret of Anjou and their seven year-old son Edward, Prince of Wales on one side, and the army of Edward, Earl of March and Warwick the Kingmaker on the other.  The Yorkists advances in rin which prevented the Lancastrian cannons from, firing and prevailed with the aid of some treachery.

St Albans  Battlefields 1455 and 1460

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The 1st Battle of St Albans was the first battle of the Wars of the Roses.  The Yorkists under the Duke of York seized king Henry VI.  The Second Battle in February 1461 was a Lancastrian victory. After a night march, a Lancastrian army attacked a Yorkist force under the Earl of Warwick from an unexpected direction. As a result King Henry VI was recaptured by the Lancastrians.   

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